Is There Help for an Injured Brain?

Just like the body, the brain does not always recover perfectly after an injury.
The brain can be injured at birth (forceps, suction, poor presentation of fetus, cord around neck). Any abnormal force to the head can result in brain injury. Brain injuries are often caused by minor bumps and hits, not just by major falls on ski slopes, baseballs to the head or a car wreck.

Brain function often improves with healing of the injury. Memory, learning, cognition, perception appear to recover and work well. The truth is, after brain injuries, conditions inside the skull may not be fine even though the brain is functioning well. Post-injury brain dysfunction often shows-up many years after a brain injury.

The brain is surrounded and supported with membranes (dura, faux, tentorium,glia) that often remain strained after injury. These membranes play an important role in function, not just structure. Science has shown (thanks to the electron microscope) that strain patterns in the membranes tend to grow in size (slowly) over time.

The membranes serve many functions including protection, circulation of fluids and in the case of the glia, even transmission of neurotransmitters. After injury these membranes often remain strained. The membranes often show patterns of torsion, compression, shear and tension. As strain patterns of the brain’s tension membrane system grow in size, dysfunction will show-up.

Dysfunction of the tension membrane system leads to symptoms like headache, tinnitus, impaired memory, disturbed sleep, brain fog, brain fatigue.

Like all fascia, the membranes around the brain are rich in collagen fibers. Post-injury, the collagen fibers often remain dis-organized instead of properly aligned. Dis-organized collagen fibers often lead to energy stasis. Stasis means that energy is not moving through the brain at normal rates and amplitudes.

Energy cysts are often found located in strained fascia and membranes. Energy cysts always disrupt normal flow of energy. Energy cysts were discovered by Drs. John E. Upledger and Z. Karni. Energy cysts are pockets of trapped energy that result from a maladaptive response to physical force.

Ideally, after a brain injury, two types of therapy should be given to prevent future problems (post-traumatic brain dysfunctions). Craniosacral therapy helps return the cranial membranes to good condition. Neurofeedback helps to restore good brain wave function. Together, these two therapies provide the best-known route to restoring brain function. In addition, together they prevent future dysfunction.